If "Break Up In the End" is indicative of Cole Swindell's next studio album, the singer is pulling back. The production, the tempo, the wall guarding his emotions — it's all repealed during this acoustic ballad.

While not his most personal performance ("You Should Be Here" will forever have that honor), the breakup song feels like one he might be living. Swindell gets the subtleties right. He's putting on a good face as he works to get over true love, but there are cracks. He's smiling throughout the lyric, but it's a fragile smile.

It's difficult to manage pure gratitude toward an ex that left you cold unless it's in an "Unanswered Prayers" kind of way. The new Swindell song is a sweet and sour love song in the spirit of Tim McGraw's "Just to See You Smile," or more recently Trent Harmon's "You Got 'Em All."

"You're worth the pain," he's saying. It's a statement that's fleeting but universal.

Did You Know?: Chase McGill, Jessie Jo Dillon and Jon Nite wrote "Break Up In the End." Nite co-wrote Lee Brice's current single, "Boy."

Watch: Cole Swindell Reads the Worst-Ever Breakup Lines

Cole Swindell, "Break Up In the End" Lyrics:

I'd still walk in that bar a little drunk / I'd still ask you what you're drinking, what's your name / I'd still kiss you by the shuffleboard, last call at 2AM / Even though we break up in the end. 

I'd introduce you to my mom and dad / Say I think I love her when you leave that room / I'd still not take their advice when I say you're moving in / Even though we break up in the end. 

Chorus:
Even if I knew you'd be the one that got away / I'd still go back and get you / Even if I knew you'd be my best and worst mistake / Oh I'd still make it with you / Over and over, again and again / Even though we break up in the end. 

I'd still play my favorite song in the car / Let you love me to it 'til it felt like ours / Not all I hear is you in it / I'd still let you ruin it / Even though we break up in the end. 

You just had one too many tonight / You're just calling because you're lonely that's OK / But you know if you come over I cannot let you in / Even though we'd break up in the end / I'd do it over and over, again and again / Even though we break up in the end.