We all know and can’t help but feel for the Grinch each time we recall his stealing of the Christmas spirit from those around him. He surely deserved the attention, but let's take a minute to regroup and focus our attention on others who aren’t as famous yet need the same if not more attention than our favorite, fuzzy green friend.

According to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report, more than 537,000 cars were stolen in 2019, resulting in over $6 billion dollars in loss nationwide. The average amount of dollar loss per stolen vehicle totaled to $8,886.

For those of you who have already started Christmas shopping or are planning on soon, we are here to remind you that car thieves don’t take the holidays off. Gathered from the National Insurance Crime Bureau, nearly 23,000 vehicles were stolen on 11 U.S. holidays last year alone. If you’re wondering, car thieves are less active on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day, but here’s how the odds stacked up in our community in 2019 the Crossroads VPD Crime Analyst:

  • New Years: 0
  • Labor Day: 1
  • Presidents Day: 0
  • New Years Eve: 0
  • Halloween: 1
  • Valentines Day: 1
  • Memorial Day: 0
  • Christmas Eve: 3
  • Independence Day: 1
  • Thanksgiving: 0
  • Christmas Day: 0

If ever there was a day to lock the car and not keep valuables inside, it's Christmas Eve! Of all the days! It is, however, a good day to find someone with a car full of presents who is not paying attention To better protect yourself against becoming a potential victim of these thieves, the NICB recommends:

  • Use common sense. Park your car in well-lit areas, close your windows and lock doors.
  • Obtain a warning device. Use an anti-theft device to deter anyone who sees you leaving your vehicle.
  • Hide your bags. Place your shopping bags and any precious or sentimental items out of sight in your vehicle, like underneath a blanket, article of clothing, or stow them away underneath seats and in the trunk.
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